Jonathan Lake Architects

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Jonathan Lake Architects
73A Redfern Street NORTH PERTH WA 6006 Australia

What interests us is where the work is and what can be created from its surroundings. Architecture for JLA is first and foremost a human environment, a place that should allow us to breathe, feel, move and see in ways that go beyond the ordinary. Works should be direct and embody enduring values of restraint and expression rather than fashion. Architecture is made, crafted and sculpted through the relentless pursuit of ideas. JLA’s ambition is to create architecture that is coherent, sensory, memorable and loved.

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Phone: 0894445570

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Projects:

Maylands Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMaylands Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMaylands Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMaylands Additions - Jonathan Lake Architects

Maylands Additions

Western Australia, 2010

This project is a highly crafted response to the clients requests for a house that respects the strength and delicacy of the existing. It is a work of humility that builds on the material and detailed richness of the existing heritage listed house. Formally the house is composed of two parts. An extension of the form of the existing house under which a new form has been inserted. The new insertion is a tight skin of timber and steel with carefully cut openings in its sides. The openings are lined with steel framed windows with exaggerated depth to help articulate the play of light and shade. The placement of these openings relate to the interior and the creation of key connections to the landscape from the interior. Internally a central concrete core creates the organizational and conceptual centre of the project. Contained within the core is the kitchen and around it are located the living spaces. The central placement of the core encourages movement and exploration. A deck is nestled outside the dining room between the new addition and an extraordinary eucalyptus tree.

Midland Mixed Use Housing - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMidland Mixed Use Housing - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMidland Mixed Use Housing - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsMidland Mixed Use Housing - Jonathan Lake Architects

Midland Mixed Use Housing

Western Australia, 2010

This project is founded on the principles of generosity and social sustainability. It has been designed for a not for profit housing provider to create much needed accommodation for working people requiring housing assistance. This building marks a new direction and standard for affordable housing provision in Western Australia. The principle of social sustainability underpins the project ensuring a diversity of residents from singles, couples and families to residents with disabilities. The location within the Railway Workshop Precinct provided significant inspiration for the project. Ideas of robustness and mass were explored through the material detailing and formal composition of the scheme. Pre cast concrete panels were utilised as robust screens and make a connection to the tradition of casting that was done in the workshops. Wrought iron balustrades and fencing were used throughout, bringing weight and texture to the external skin of the building. Generosity was the generative principle behind the planning and organising of the project. Each individual apartment has a large open plan living, kitchen, dining area connected to large external living areas. All apartments have floor to ceiling glazing creating an unobstructed connection with the surrounding site. Seven custom made artworks were integrated into the skin of the building.

Fremantle Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsFremantle Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsFremantle Additions - Jonathan Lake ArchitectsFremantle Additions - Jonathan Lake Architects

Fremantle Additions

Fremantle WA, 2012

This project is a highly crafted and tactile addition to a beautiful limestone colonial bungalow. It is an addition that draws heavily on the physical and material character of the existing house and sought to provide a contemporary re-presentation of these elements. Formally the original house is a corrugated iron roof over rough heavy walls with dark interiors and no connection to the external environment. The limestone rubble walls create a striking roughness and texture to the exterior while internally creating deep thresholds between spaces. The new addition takes these qualities of material, light and tactility and reinterprets them to create a series of spaces that are designed to elevate the experience of living. Rammed Limestone walls were created to continue the weightiness of the existing but to introduce a more tactile surface. Over the walls a dynamic metal clad roof structure has been carefully placed. The profile of the roof reflects its role in opening up the interior bringing light and ventilation deep within. The outcome is a carefully crafted exploration of materials and restraint in order to create a beautiful environment for living.

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