Sally Draper Architects

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Sally Draper Architects
1 / 45 Watkins Street FITZROY NORTH VIC 3068 Australia

Sally Draper Architects is one of Melbourne’s most respected design practices. It has a strong heritage and has produced a substantial body of residential, institutional and urban design work. The firm has earned numerous awards and deep client loyalty. Each project is a collaborative endeavour between the client and design team. The uniqueness and importance of each client’s situation and needs are the starting point, with time invested in listening, understanding and crafting a brief which seeds the resolution of the design. What results are projects that respond directly to clients’ ethos and values as well as their functional and aesthetic concerns.

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Projects:

Westernport House - Sally Draper ArchitectsWesternport House - Sally Draper ArchitectsWesternport House - Sally Draper ArchitectsWesternport House - Sally Draper Architects

Westernport House

Mornington Peninsula, 2010

This four bedroom house overlooking Westernport Bay provides both a private retreat for its owners and a welcoming social environment for family and friends. Its form echoes the simple rural forms of the surrounding district and presents a calm, screened façade to the street, opening to the north via a series of linked external decks and terraces. The internal and external spaces offer a range of possibilities for engaging directly with this beautiful coastal site.

Wildfell, Melbourne Girls Grammar - Sally Draper ArchitectsWildfell, Melbourne Girls Grammar - Sally Draper ArchitectsWildfell, Melbourne Girls Grammar - Sally Draper ArchitectsWildfell, Melbourne Girls Grammar - Sally Draper Architects

Wildfell, Melbourne Girls Grammar

South Yarra, 2011

Wildfell forms the heart of MGGS’s middle school. Located within the school’s Merton Hall campus in South Yarra, the project explores the possibility of creating a rich learning environment for middle years children on a dense inner urban site. Constructed under the school’s playing fields, the precinct opens towards the north, allowing an integration of indoor and outdoor learning areas. Internal areas are designed as a flexible range of settings for staff/student and student/student interaction. The technology rich environments of the general areas are enhanced by a specialist ‘digilab’ facility which provides a more focused, interactive environment. Circulation areas are seen as important opportunities for social interaction. An open kitchen adjoining the central double height gathering space provides a sense of community and identity to the precinct.

Birrarung Marr Footbridge and Bells - Sally Draper ArchitectsBirrarung Marr Footbridge and Bells - Sally Draper ArchitectsBirrarung Marr Footbridge and Bells - Sally Draper ArchitectsBirrarung Marr Footbridge and Bells - Sally Draper Architects

Birrarung Marr Footbridge and Bells

Melbourne CBD, 2001

The Pedestrian Bridge in Birrarung Marr is a 300m long timber and steel structure linking the upper platform of the park to Speakers Corner. The bridge links the city to the river, the constructed environment to the natural and provides a transition between the rigid gridded forms of one and the fluid nature of the other. It explores the ideas of rhythm and movement, containment and exposure, texture and sound. Its central steel spine is profiled in response to the spacing of the support columns which vary with the distance of the bridge above the ground. The superstructure is a delicately crafted series of timber beams and decking. The Federation Bells were commissioned by the Melbourne International Festival of the Arts on behalf of Arts Victoria. They were conceived as a permanent sculptural installation within Birrarung Marr to celebrate the centenary of Federation. Designed in collaboration with sculptor Anton Hassell, acoustic designer Neil McLachlan and lighting designer Nathan Thompson, the installation investigates a new way of seeing and experiencing bells. Twenty six small bells supported on tall slender columns form a unifying background grid to the field as a whole. Randomly placed within this grid are 13 large bells. These are the dominant elements within the composition, and their free layout and varying heights, reflect their sculptural quality. There is an intentional delicacy to the installation which provides a counterpoint to the robust solidity of the city beyond. Swaney Draper Architects

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