Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty Ltd

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Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty Ltd
Level1 19 Foster Street SURRY HILLS NSW 2010 Australia

Tanner Architects is a multi-disciplinary practice based in Sydney that brings together the skills of contemporary architecture, adaptive re-use, interior design, urban design and strategic planning. With over 35 years experience our creativity, versatility and commitment to design excellence is reflected in numerous awards and publications. Embracing a wide range of architectural building types, our experience covers many project sectors including public, commercial, educational, residential developments and individual houses – many including themes of architectural heritage and adaptive reuse.

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Canberra Glassworks - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCanberra Glassworks - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCanberra Glassworks - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCanberra Glassworks - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty Ltd

Canberra Glassworks

Canberra, 2008

The Canberra Glassworks is an adaptation of the former Kingston Powerhouse, Canberra’s oldest permanent building. With a prominent position in the Kingston Foreshore redevelopment on the southern edge of Lake Burley Griffin, the building is now an access centre for glass artists. Public facilities include a gallery space, retail shop and cafe. The centre allows for public interaction with a mezzanine level and tiered seating performance area, allowing public viewing of the working studios. An innovative design solution has been developed that meets the functional requirements of a glass centre, within the constraints of an existing building. Sustainable environmental design principles include capturing the waste heat from glass furnaces for building services, passive heating and cooling systems (including geothermal), advanced daylight capture, and waste water and storm water reuse.

Crawford School - ANU - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCrawford School - ANU - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCrawford School - ANU - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdCrawford School - ANU - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty Ltd

Crawford School – ANU

Canberra, 2009

The Crawford School at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra is Australia’s leading policy school focused on Australia, Asia and the Pacific Region. This new three storey building, situated in the grounds of Old Canberra House provides purpose designed teaching spaces, academic/staff offices, conference rooms and a caf?. Teaching spaces include a 200 seat fan shaped tiered lecture theatre and a 70 seat ‘horse shoe’ shaped tiered theatre. Partly situated within remnant native vegetation of the Acton Peninsula Conservation Area, this new building has been designed to minimise its impact and nestle into the existing landscape. The building incorporates a number of environmental initiatives including high levels of natural ventilation and day lighting, energy efficient mixed mode mechanical systems, tempered corridor spaces, rain water collection and water efficient fittings. The purpose designed building provides a new face for the Crawford School.

Pacific Road House - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdPacific Road House - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdPacific Road House - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty LtdPacific Road House - Tanner Kibble Denton Architects Pty Ltd

Pacific Road House

Palm Beach, Sydney, 2010

Set amongst a stand of angophoras, this new pavilion and extension to an original Palm Beach sandstone cottage, is designed to provide holiday accommodation for an extended family. The original sandstone weekender has been extended to include new kitchen and bathroom facilities, wrapped in a curved timber clad form. This new form is set apart from the existing cottage with a glazed link that allows light to penetrate deep into the plan. Updated living and sleeping areas have been provided on 2 levels with a double sided open fire dominating the main living area and creating an intimate study / library space which is lined in Japanese Sen Veneer. The new pavilion is linked to the cottage with a sinuous covered walkway through the angophoras, and is itself a timber clad curved wall element. There was a strong desire to retain all trees on site and so the form of the pavilion was borne out of this desire and also with a view to capturing the best views. The pavilion is skewed on the site (matching the existing cottage) to orient towards the spectacular views over Palm Beach and Barrenjoey, with openings on the curved ends of the pavilion carefully placed to capture particular ocean and district views. The structuring of the two elements on site has also allowed the creation of the private sheltered landscape area which is the focus of family living.

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