Harrison and White Pty Ltd

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Harrison and White Pty Ltd
First Floor 51 Leicester Street CARLTON VIC 3053 Australia

Harrison and White (HAW) is an award-winning architectural practice formed in 2006 after a series of project collaborations between directors Stuart Harrison and Marcus White. New ideas and a fresh and engaging approach to architectural problems is the core direction of the practice. The practice is dedicated to innovation and collaboration in servicing its clients and end users of projects.

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Phone: 0393494221
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Projects:

Preston City Oval - Harrison and White Pty LtdPreston City Oval - Harrison and White Pty LtdPreston City Oval - Harrison and White Pty LtdPreston City Oval - Harrison and White Pty Ltd

Preston City Oval

Preston, Victoria, 2011

Harrison and White were appointed architects by City of Darebin for the redevelopment of two buildings at Preston City Oval. The project provides new community spaces that are flexible and well connected. The existing 1926 Pavilion design by Harry Norris was carefully refurbished internally to create a function and community room facing onto the football and cricket oval. An exterior deck was added for external viewing, highly connected to the new interior space via tilt-up glazed doors. The interior itself embraces the underside of the grandstand, a quality that had been lost, and using the original structure to inform the space and lighting. A new entry building gives clear orientation as well as proving new toilet facilities. This is clad in stone at its base with steel mesh above, screening new mechanical equipment that provides a variety of air cooling and ventilation options for the function and community space. The two buildings face the Epping train line, and new steel platform provides the armature for a dynamic screen and graphic element, across which the name of the oval is cast, and backlit at night.

Foyn-Johanson House - Harrison and White Pty LtdFoyn-Johanson House - Harrison and White Pty LtdFoyn-Johanson House - Harrison and White Pty LtdFoyn-Johanson House - Harrison and White Pty Ltd

Foyn-Johanson House

Northcote, Victoria, 2010

We see one of the key issues in Australian housing being how we use the sun to improve new and existing houses. In this project we made a very clear attempt to form a house around the idea of preserving light into a garden space. As houses become (often unnecessarily) bigger and blocks smaller, the available land for gardens is reduced. We have created a garden that enjoys light all day – the form has cut from it the rays of the morning sun to ensure light falls onto the growing area, one which the clients will use for the growing of food. This process is achieved by reverse shadow casting – taking the area of space that is to have direct light and extruding it along the different paths of the sun. This is then subtracted from the barn-like form that is allowed under the planning controls, to the maximum height of 9m. The surface created from this then becomes the external screen – and this acts as both balustrading and sun screening to the deck and western façade.

Joy Melbourne Radio Station - Harrison and White Pty LtdJoy Melbourne Radio Station - Harrison and White Pty LtdJoy Melbourne Radio Station - Harrison and White Pty LtdJoy Melbourne Radio Station - Harrison and White Pty Ltd

Joy Melbourne Radio Station

Melbourne, 2008

This new home for Joy Melbourne, Australia’s first and leading Gay and Lesbian radio station, occupies level 9 of 225 Bourke Street ‘ the ‘City Village’ project initiated by the City of Melbourne. The fit-out converted generic office space into four new acoustically separated studios, upgraded remaining office space and staff facilities. There was a strong emphasis on sustainability ‘ both in the relocation of the station into the city and in the use of sustainable materials. Core to this was the exposed use of compacted straw panelling, sometimes used for radio studios, but used here for the first time unfinished. Exposed and naturally finished plywood has been used for wide reveals and furniture. MDF was avoided and new painting kept to a minimum. The re-organisation of the station involved putting ‘upfront’ the key spaces ‘ the radio studios themselves. In this way it is evident that this is a working radio station when in the busy lift lobby. A direct engagement with the city was established ‘ the studios have great views across to the State Library dome and up Bourke Street across new rooftop bars towards Parliament and St Patrick’s beyond. The front foyer space is a merging of meeting room, foyer, reception and green room and creates a significant flexible space that gives entries to the new studios, which form a wall of openings, and suggested a small streetscape.

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